Shadow X5 Finds by Bobby McKinney of Rosenberg, Texas
mckinney@fbnet.net


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Within a few weeks of purchasing my X5 last summer , the Texas coastal was hit with a tropical depression coming in at the Galveston and Freeport area. The storm came ashore late in the week and by the weekend detectorist were searching the beaches all along the Texas SE coast line. I decided to search the coastal fort site at old Velasco on Saturday morning but as I got there I found I was not alone as there were about 15 other diggers already metal detecting. Getting on my gear, I grabbed my new X5 and joined in on the hunting. Minie balls and musket balls were being found, a large cent was dug and some cannister shot and numerous seated coins were also found by other diggers. As I hunted the high water mark, I noticed a 10 foot long stretch where the sand had washed back behind the vegetation line and the weeds has draped over the bank of sand. Everyone was passing this small spot by rather than move the weeds out of the way. I quickly seized this small section of beach. Using my shovel, I pushed back the overhanging wall of vegetation and started to detect the shallow bank in the sand. I hadn't moved 2 feet when I got a hit on my X5. Digging out the soft sand bank, I scanned the sand again and pin pointed the target. There it was, a nice solid cast circa 1830's Mexican army button of the 11th Infantry.( Known as the JJ button) This unit been stationed at the garrison at Velasco since 1828 and came under siege by Texian settlers during the 1832 Battle of Velasco. The X5 had kicked some early Texas history butt and obviously, that rare button was the find of the day. I can only say you did it again Troy and thanks.

Bobby McKinney


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Digging in a Confederate fort site on the Texas coast , you can usually find the remains of shell fragments from the Federal gunboat bombardments. However, when a complete shell turns up , you know you just got your "bonus" find for the days hunt. I had dug several large frags at the site of Fort Sulakoski on the Brazos river on this day when I got another large hit with my X2. After digging down about 18 inches , my shovel hit with a hard thud. As I started digging out the hole, I could see the slight curve of something iron and knew immediately it was a shell, but my surprise as the hole got bigger ,so dig the shell. I was thinking it was likely a 26 pndr used by the Reb batteries at the fort but when this basket ball size shell started to emerge, I realized then ,this could only be a deadly 11inch Federal Dahlgren shell that had been fired by a Union gunboat. The shell weighed 120 lbs.and still had a Naval watercap fuse in it dated 1862 and was also in excellent condition. To say the least, this was a real trophy find for any civil war relic collector. I must brag on the X2 Troy, it is the most stable machine I have ever used in a salt water environment. Thanks for a great detector.

Bobby McKinney


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